Patanjali Pineapple Jam

ingredients-patanjali-pineapple-jam patanjali-pine-apple-jam

 

 

 

 

Summary feedback

Patanjali Pineapple Jam is a newbie in the already crowded Jam industry.

This product contains artificial chemical flavours and preservatives, the Patanjali Pineapple jam has a shocking 71.83 gm of sugar per 100 gm pack. Such high sugar content is harmful for the health of kids and adults who consume it as regularly consuming this product may cause obesity and diabetes in adults and also childhood obesity in kids.

The foodnetindia rating for this product :-

foodnetindia safety rating: 3 – (On a scale of 1 to 10 from very unsafe to very safe)

If Patanjali Pineapple jam was eaten every day, we would give this a highly unsafe rating of 1 or 2. However, as it is usually eaten in servings of 20-40 grams, despite the high sugar content, we will give it a rating of 3. The product also contains (unknown) artificial chemical preservatives and artificial flavouring substances used in the product.

The Jam is very sugary at 71.83 gms of sugar in 100 gms of jam, it seems that the manufacturers intended sugar to be the main ingredient and not fruit.

foodnetindia wholesomeness rating: 2- (On a scale of 1 to 10 from very unbalanced nutrition profile to excellent nutrition profile)

The Jam is very sugary and is unsafe when consumed in large quantities for obese people and diabetics as it contains 71.83 gm of sugar per 100 gms of jam.

Ingredients of concern in Patanjali Pineapple Jam

Sugar

It does not specify which sugar has been used. This product is definitely not for diabetics and obese people. The source of sugar is not mentioned on the food label and is important because different sugars have different metabolic effects. For example, Sucrose (Cane Sugar) is very different from Fructose (Fruit Sugar). Some foods use high fructose corn syrup which may be harmful in much lower quantities than sucrose.  We believe that it is not responsible behaviour for a brand to not clearly state what ingredients have been used.

Sugar is a carbohydrate found naturally in a host of different foods from lactose in milk to the fructose in fruit and honey. In fact, we need some sugar in our diets to supply ready energy to fuel our muscles and keep our brains active. The problem is that many processed foods have added sugar which supplies energy in the form of calories – and very little else. This means our body has to draw on the nutrients from the rest of our diet to process it and this can affect our health, including our immunity – leaving us more prone to bugs and colds. A high intake of sugar causes our blood sugar levels to shoot up, giving us that feel-good ‘high’ followed by a crashing slump which leaves us tired, irritable and craving more sugary foods. It’s a vicious cycle that may be contributing to our weight problems as well as health concerns like
diabetes and heart disease.

Pectin IN 440
Pectin is a natural acid polysaccharide present in nearly all fruits, especially apples, quinces and oranges. It is commercially produced from apple pulp and orange peels. Sodium, potassium, and ammonium pectates are the respective salts of pectin.

It is used as a thickening agent, emulsifier, stabiliser. Amidated pectin is prepared by treating pectin with ammonia, after which amides are formed at the acid side chains. It is used in Marmalades, fruit jellies and sauces, and many other different products.

Pectin acts as a thickening agent; thus, it may cause intestinal problems when present in high concentrations. As a result of its thickening effect, it is also used in diet preparations, where it reduces the feeling of hunger. It can be fermented in the large intestine, resulting in flatulence.

Added Flavours- Pineapple

This food product does not specify which flavours or flavouring substances have been used. The flavours should be specified as some of them have serious side effects and may not be suitable for infants, pregnant women or people who are allergic. We believe that it is not responsible behaviour for a brand to avoid clearly stating what ingredients have been used.

By not specifying what these flavours and substances are, we are forced to consider what they are hiding and why would they be so reluctant to mention what they have used in the food product!

By this behaviour, these manufacturers expose people to possible allergens or toxins that could be avoided if consumers knew what they were.

Sodium benzoate IN 211

Benzoic acid, benzoates and benzoic acid esters are commonly found in most fruits, especially berries. Cranberries are a very rich source of benzoic acid. In addition to fruits, benzoates occur naturally in mushrooms, cinnamon, cloves and some dairy products (as a result of bacterial fermentation). For commercial purposes, it is prepared chemically from toluene.

Benzoic acid and benzoates are used as preservatives against both yeasts and bacteria in acidic products. They are not very effective against fungi, and ineffective in products with a pH above 5 (slightly acidic or neutral). High concentrations have an acid taste, which limits the application. Benzoates are often preferred, due to better solubility. In some people benzoic acid and benzoates may liberate histamine and thus cause pseudo-allergic reactions.

Tatrazine IN 102

Tartrazine is an azo dye. No side effects are known for pure tartrazine, except in people who are intolerant to salicylates (aspirin, berries, fruits); in that case tartrazine also induces intolerance symptoms.

In combination with benzoates (E210-215), tartrazine is implicated in a large percentage of cases of ADHD syndrome (hyperactivity) in children. Asthmatics may also experience symptoms following consumption of tartrazine, as it is a known histamine-liberating agent.

Other ingredients that are in the product but not a major source of concern in our opinion are:

  • Pineapple fruit pulp (45%)
  • Citric Acid: IN 330

Disclaimer – The information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. It is intended as a sharing of knowledge and information. foodnetindia encourages you to make your own health care decisions based upon your research and in partnership with a qualified health care professional.

The ingredients list of the product may have changed since this page was published. Consumers are encouraged to read warnings, labels, ingredient lists, etc.

Replies, if any, from the brand, will be published here ‘As is’