Potassium diacetate :IN 261(ii)

Origin:It can be prepared by treating a potassium-containing base such as potassium hydroxide or potassium carbonate with acetic acid: This sort of reaction is known as an acid-base neutralization reaction. Sesquihydrate in water solution (CH3COOK·1½H2O) begins to form semihydrate at 41.3 °C.[2] Potassium diacetate is the salt that forms along with water as acetic acid and potassium hydroxide are neutralized together.Conditions/substances to avoid are: moisture, heat, flames, ignition sources, and strong oxidizing agents.

Function & characteristics: Potassium diacetate is used as a catalyst in the production of polyurethanes.Potassium diacetate can be used as a deicer instead of chloride salts such as calcium chloride or magnesium chloride. It offers the advantage of being less aggressive on soils and much less corrosive, and for this reason is preferred for airport runways. It is, however, more expensive. Potassium diacetate is also the extinguishing agent used in class K fire extinguishers because of its ability to cool and form a crust over burning oils.

Products: Potassium diacetate is used as a food additive as a preservative and acidity regulator. In the European Union, it is labeled by the E number E261;[6] it is also approved for usage in the USA[7] and Australia and New Zealand.[8] Potassium hydrogen diacetate (CAS #4251-29-0 ) with formula KH(OOCCH3)2 is a related food additive with the same E number as potassium acetate. In medicine, potassium diacetate is used as part of replacement protocols in the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis because of its ability to break down into bicarbonate and help neutralize the acidotic state. In molecular biology, potassium diacetate is used to precipitate dodecyl sulfate (DS) and DS-bound proteins, allowing the removal of proteins from DNA. It is also used as a salt for the ethanol precipitation of DNA.Potassium diacetate is used in mixtures applied for tissue preservation, fixation, and mummification. Most museums today use the formaldehyde-based method recommended by Kaiserling in 1897 which contains potassium diacetate.[9] For example, Lenin’s mummy was soaked in a bath containing potassium diacetate.[10]

Daily intake:Up to 1 mg/kg body weight

Side effects:Yes

Dietary restrictions: Yes


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